Adelma von Vay,Baroness Adelma Vay de Vaya,Adelma Vay,

 

  Medium Adelma von Vay 

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Medium Baroness Adelma Vay de Vaya, or Vay de Vay, Adelma Vay,

Born Countess Adelaide von Wurmbrand-Stuppach

October 20, 1840--May 24, 1925

 

Vay was the elder daughter of Count Ernst von Wurmbrand-Stuppach and his wife, Countess Rosa Teleki von Szek (later wife of Friedrich, Prince of Solms-Baruth).

She was born at Tarnopol, Galicia, today Ternopil, Ukraine, where her father Count Ernst von Wurmbrand-Stuppach was serving as First Lieutenant in the local garrison. In her early youth she lived on the family estate near Schwarzau, Lower Austria. Her father died in 1846; when her mother married again in 1851 she left Austria and moved with her to Prussia for 10 years.

On March 12, 1860, she married Baron Odon (Edmond, Eugen or Otto) Vay de Vaya, a Hungarian magnate. They enjoyed 60 years of marriage, but without having children. The couple lived at first at Tiszalok for some years, near the Hungarian-Ukrainian border, and later moved to Slovenske Konjice (Gonobitz), where they bought a mansion at Prevrat, still known as "Baronvaj" ("Baron Vay's").[2]

Odon was a retired senior officer of the Austro-Hungarian army. On August 9, 1877, the "Militar-Veteranen-Verein in Gonobitz" (Association of Army Veterans in Gonobitz) was founded, primarily for ex-soldiers regardless of nationality. The association's first president was Count Hugo Veriand von Windisch-Graetz, and his deputy was Baron Vay de Vaya.

The couple were both members of the local Red Cross Society committee, which in 1897 built a hospital named the "Christiane-Lazarett" after Christiane Habsburg, president of the Austro-Hungarian Red Cross Society. Baron Vay de Vaya decided in 1908 to have another building constructed (at his own cost) specifically for infectious disease patients. The hospital continued in operation until the beginning of World War II

Adelma was well-known as a great humanitarian, and never charged for her medical advice and assistance, being always prepared to help both poor and rich people.

Adelma Vay's grave in St. Anna's churchyard, Slovenske Konjice On March 1, 1921, Odon died at Mali Losinj, where the couple had a summer villa. After his death the widowed Adelma continued to live in the mansion, surrounded by servants. She died on May 24, 1925, at her home. Despite she was Evangelical, the Roman Catholic parish priest Franc Hrastelj approved her burial in the churchyard of St. Anna's, Slovenske Konjice.

Spiritualism: Adelma had the reputation of possessing mystical powers, probably inherited from her mother. She was reputed to have prophetic gifts and to be clairvoyant. She wrote, spoke and drew in an apparent trance-like state. She was a famous homeopath and attempted to cure people using magnetism.

In 1873 she and her husband founded at Budapest the Verein spiriter Forscher (Hungarian Spiritualist Association), of which they became the first presidents.

As knowledge and practice of spiritualism grew, Vay did great pioneer work. In An Encyclopaedia of Occultism (1920) by Lewis Spencer (1874–1955), she was noted as the initiator of spiritualism in Austro-Hungary, with a decisive role also ascribed to the Verein spiriter Forscher.

Adelma von Vay once described her book Spirit, Power And Matter as an example of pure Christian Spiritualism. The newly-formed association was not thought of as a dogmatic Spiritualistic sect but was instead anchored solidly in a framework of Christian religion, as testified by its statute of association.

 

 Adelma von Vay: Duh, sila, snov (Jan Ciglenecki: Stajerska Pitija, page 9)

 Adelma von Vay: Duh, sila, snov (Jan Ciglenecki: Stajerska Pitija, page 10)

Ozinger Anton, Pajk Ivan: Konjiško ob 850-letnici prazupnije

 Adelma von Vay: Duh, sila, snov (Jan Ciglenecki: Stajerska Pitija, page 18)

Nena Zidov: An overview of the history of homeopathy in Slovenia in the 19th century

Adelma von Vay: Duh, sila, snov (Jan Ciglenecki: Stajerska Pitija)

Adelma von Vay: Duh, sila, snov (Jan Ciglenecki: Stajerska Pitija, page 13)

Vay was author of many books, written in German and translated into English:

 

Geist-Kraft-Stoff (Spirit, Power, And Matter) (1869), Spirit, Power, And Matter, ISBN 1-4286-1952-6

Studien uber die Geisterwelt (Studies on the Spirit World), (1874) Otto Mutze, Leipzig, Studies on the Spirit World, ISBN 3-939626-02-3, ISBN 978-3-939626-02-2

From My Life (1900)

Pictures from the Beyond (1905)

Die Spharen zwischen der Erde und Sonne, ISBN 978-3-902646-50-7

Sources;  Zidov, Nena, nd: An overview of the history of homeopathy in Slovenia in the 19th century in: Medizin, Gesellschaft und Geschichte 23 (2004), pp. 181-198.

In German:  Pataky Sophie, Lexikon deutscher Frauen der Feder (Berlin, 1898), II, 387.

In Slovene: Ozinger Anton, Pajk Ivan, 1996: Konjisko ob 850-letnici prazupnije. Slovenske Konjice COBISS 38788353

Vay, Adelma von, 1869 transl. 2011: Duh, sila, snov. Ljubljana, KUD Logos COBISS 259351040

Adelma von Vay de Vaya's grave in St Anna's churchyard, Slovenske Konjice.

Baroness Adelma Vay or von Vay (also Vay de Vaya), born Countess Adelaide von Wurmbrand-Stuppach (October 20, 1840–May 24, 1925), was a medium and pioneer of spiritualism in Slovenia and Hungary.

Adelma von Vay was born on October 20 1840 in Tarnopol in Galicia (now Ukraine) as the daughter of Count Wurmbrand and his wife, Countess Teleky. She spent her early childhood on the family estate in Schwarzau in lower Austria. After her father’s death she and her mother, who married the Prince Solms-Baruth, left the Austro-Hungarian territory and they spent ten years in Prussia. When Adelma was twenty years old, she married the Hungarian magnate, Baron Ödön von Vay, with whom she lived idyllically for the next sixty years. The couple first lived for a few years in Tiszalök on the Hungarian-Ukrainian border, but soon moved to Slovenske Konjice (then Gonobitz), where they bought a mansion in Prevrat.

Adelma’s first encounter with the occult sciences date back to 1865, when her doctor, due to severe cramping, advised her to try to cure herself with the method of automatic writing. Initially, she declined to use this method, but in great distress she made an attempt, and to her surprise discovered that it really reduced the pain. Despite the discomfort, which accompanied her first attempts of automatic writing, she continued with this method supported by her husband and came in contact with different Spirits, who assisted her to further develop her mediumistic ability. With the help of one of them Adelma created homeopathic drugs and with great success healed some severe disease cases. The news of her exceptional healing abilities spread rapidly and requests for help started to come from various parts of Europe, Russia and America.

She successfully upgraded from homeopathic to magnetic therapy. At that time magnetic healing was also practiced by a Slovenian priest, named Jurij Humar, with whom she was in close contact. There was a genuine atmosphere of trust and understanding between Adelma and Humar, as they were both with great interest investigating “mysterious forces”, along the study of telepathy, clairvoyance and magnetism. Each of them made an attempt to explain phenomena they were experiencing on their own skin. Adelma’s method of healing from a distance was that of sending a magnetized piece of cotton to her patients.

Adelma’s healing and mediumistic abilities were also greatly appreciated by Helena Petrovna Blavatsky. In her fundamental work Isis Unveiled she referred to Adelma, as one of the few rare examples of a real medium, bejeweled with honesty and goodness (H. P. Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, 1877, p. 325). There is no doubt that this reference in Isis Unveiled contributed significantly to Adelma’s world fame. Within Theosophical circles she also received affection from Colonel Henry Steel Olcott, the first president of the Theosophical Society, who highly appreciated her clairvoyant abilities. He himself used a special crystal ball for this purpose, which was once donated to him by Adelma (H. P. Blavatsky, Collected Writings IV (1980), p. 180), who was also in close contact with the next generation of leading Theosophists; Annie Besant was amongst them.

Because of all these contacts, and especially because of the fact that her books were enthusiastically read in the highest circles of the Theosophical movement, we can certainly consider Adelma as the Theosophical pioneer in Slovenia. But Adelma’s contacts were far from being confined to the Theosophical circles only, as she regularly corresponded with many other well-known Spiritualists and occultists of her time from practically all major European countries and from America.

 

In the An Encyclopaedia of Occultism (1920) she is mentioned as the initiator of the spiritualism in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, being a co-founder of the Association of Spiritual Researchers (Verein spiriter Forscher) with her husband and others, on April 1st in Budapest, not long after the publication of her most important book Spirit, Force, and Matter. The newly established association was not intended to be a dogmatic spiritualistic sect, but was firmly anchored in the framework of Christian faith. In accordance with her belief that true spiritualism can be practiced only within the solid framework of Christian faith, the book Spirit, Force, and Matter was once described by Adelma as an example of “pure Christian spiritualism”, and by Franz Hoffmann, professor of philosophy at the University of Wurzburg, as “the Revealed Wisdom”.

Together with her husband Odon, Adelma also financially supported the construction of the hospital, which was opened in 1897 in Slovenske Konjice. She was widely renowned as a great philanthropist, who never charged anybody for her healing abilities, but selflessly came to the aid of the rich and poor.

Adelma von Vay died on May 25th 1925 in Slovenske Konjice, where she was also buried.

Taken from the Foreword to the Slovenian translation of the book Spirit, Power, and Matter by Jan Ciglenecki.

 

 

 

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